Socio-Cultural Dynamics (SCD) is founded on a combination of system dynamics and cultural anthropology, enhanced by a unique set of techniques to eliminate frames and filters that naturally occur in discovering common patterns in socio-cultural groups.

The reason for the application of cultural anthropological techniques is simple to understand.  In recent decades, as Western society has grown more diverse and increased in complexity, anthropologists have found success, by using the same research techniques they have used to study less developed societies and indigenous peoples around the world, in studying the attributes and afflictions of urbanized societies to include healthcare delivery systems, the handling of consumer complaints, corporate bureaucracies, religious cults, and street gangs.

Its meta-methodology concerns the process by which the classifications, patterns, and analytical methods of Socio-Cultural Dynamics are derived. Building on social dynamics and system dynamics, it adds cultural components and a means of discovering universal patterns in a standard taxonomy, such that a common language of any complex behavioral system can be described in a way that improves the probability of identifying and predicting outcomes.

This meta-methodology requires the rigorous techniques of well-partitioned software design, applied massively to real-world scenarios of human and animal behavior, simulated in time-sequenced dynamical models, then tested against alternative predictions to find those processes and patterns that best fit empirical outcomes.

Its component aspects include the mechanism of discovery and testing of universal socio-cultural patterns and language (Complex Adaptive Systems Anthropology), the development of universal core behavioral models and the application of these models to real-world situations (Socio-Cultural Dynamics), and the cultural adoption of more effective human interaction in both formal and informal situations (Dialog-Action-Transaction).

Complex Adaptive Systems Anthropology (CASA) is the application of systems theory, linguistics and artificial intelligence concepts, and cultural anthropology to fieldwork in the identification of universal normative socio-cultural patterns that can be tested for probabilistic predictive value using Bayesian and Monte Carlo models

CASA combines the following disciplines:

  • Rigorous modeling practice applied to complex socio-cultural systems, including scenarios/dynamical use cases, testing and recursive revisions
  • Testing and formation of meta-dialog patterns and consolidation into conceptual-pattern thesauri
  • Classification of universal socio-cultural patterns by probabilistic abduction logic and parallax, cloaked, role-based empiricism
  • Theory and practice of a formal Dialog-Action-Transaction (DAT) model of human behavior, applied to fieldwork scenarios

The results of formulation and testing of formal patterns as raw material for system dynamics simulations gives a more efficient, timely, and accurate representation of the system, with greater predictive capability.

Socio-Cultural Dynamics (SCD) is the application of universal normative patterns to socio-cultural phenomena within system dynamics models to optimize the discovery of high-leverage points for improving the overall "performance" of the system under inspection. The modeling portion of SCD includes the development of the core models that can be applied universally to multiple behavioral system domains with minor customization.

Socio-Cultural Dynamics Modeling combines the following disciplines:

  • System dynamics theory and its intellectual offspring, social dynamics
  • Rigorous modeling practice applied to complex socio-cultural systems
  • Application of universal socio-cultural pattern thesauri to dialog and meta-dialog
  • Applicatiion of universal socio-cultural pattern taxonomies

Each of these disciplines has proven its value in professional domains, although usually within a much narrower perspective. Their combined application to real-world situations of complex socio-cultural systems, however, with accompanying measurement of soft variables, makes SCD unique.

Socio-Cultural Dynamics (SCD) is the application of universal normative patterns to socio-cultural phenomena within system dynamics models to optimize the discovery of high-leverage points for improving the overall "performance" of the system under inspection. The analytical portion of the methodology is that which uses these models to provide alternative courses of action and measures the probability of successful outcomes.

SCD Analysis combines the following disciplines:

  • System dynamics theory and its intellectual offspring, social dynamics
  • Rigorous modeling practice applied to complex socio-cultural systems
  • Meta-dialog analysis using conceptually-patterned thesauri
  • Understanding and application of Dialog-Action-Transaction (DAT) models in the inspection process

Each of these disciplines has proven its value in professional domains, although usually within a much narrower perspective. Their combined application to real-world situations of complex socio-cultural systems, however, with accompanying measurement of soft variables, makes SCD unique.

There are six levels of participation within Coflict's Socio-Cultural Dynamics (SCD) methodology. The first level is Acter, one who engages in dialogues, actions, and transactions (DAT) as a participant with some understanding of the methodology as it relates to DAT patterns and processes.

The second level is Observer, one who observes the dialogues, actions, and transactions of other actors within the system without directly participating in the transactions, and using the techniques of cloaking, partitioning, and mapping.

The third level is Analyst, one who understands the taxonomy of socio-cultural dynamics, can apply this to observations of a working system, and measure outcomes of the observed system accurately and coherently.

The fourth-level Modeler role denotes a level of expertise in performing system dynamics simulations as either new models or extensions of existing Coflict SCD models.

The fifth-level Coach role signifies expertise in the previous four levels with the added skill of being able to apply the principles and methods of SCD in real time to people or groups seeking their expertise.

The sixth level of Prescriber is reserved for one who can create new models within a domain, applying parallax experience across disparate domains to select the optimal model for achieving the objectives and outcomes desired by the owners of the domain.

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